Episode 4 - Interview with Dr. Jan Hasbrouck, PhD (formerly of University of Oregon)

Glean Education's.png

What’s inside: In this episode, we interview Jan Hasbrouck, PhD, nationally recognized researcher and expert in the area of Reading Fluency. We’ll talk about her research resulted in the creation of national norms for student reading fluency and the recent revision of those norms, "2017 National Reading Fluency Norms (Update).

Classroom Implications: The 2017 research on fluency rates did not show statistically significant changes in reading fluency rates. Teachers can use the revised norms as a dependable benchmark with which to compare their student’s reading fluency rate. Dr. Hasbrouck also delves into what reading fluency is and how Oral Reading Fluency (ORF) measures can be used as a tool to support proficient reading acquisition in students.

Learn more about our guest: To learn more about Dr. Jan Hasbrouck head to gha-pd.com.

Below are some links to research and published works referenced in this episode (full text included where possible):

Episode 3 - Interview with Dr. Marina Puglisi

What’s inside: In this episode, we interview Marina Puglisi, a Speech-Language Pathologist and researcher in the area of child language and child developmental language disorders at the Universidade Federal de Sao Paolo, Brazil. We will discuss her study named, "The Home Literacy Environment Is a Correlate, but Perhaps Not a Cause, of Variations in Children’s Language and Literacy Development".

Classroom implications: In this study, researchers investigated whether the home literacy environment predicts children’s reading and language skills once maternal language abilities are taken into account. They found that after controlling for variations in maternal language, storybook exposure was no longer a significant predictor of children’s language and literacy skills. On the other hand, direct literacy instruction (explicit teaching of those basic literacy elements like phonological awareness, phonics, and sight words) remained a predictor of children’s reading/spelling skills. The researchers argue that the relationship between early informal home literacy activities and children’s language and reading skills is complex and largely explained by maternal skills.

Learn more about our guest: To learn more about upcoming research from Dr. Marina Puglisi, you can follow her on researchgate.net/profile/Marina_Puglisi.

Below are some links to research and published works referenced in this episode (full text included where possible):

  • Marina L. Puglisi, Charles Hulme, Lorna G. Hamilton & Margaret J. Snowling (2017) The Home Literacy Environment Is a Correlate, but Perhaps Not a Cause, of Variations in Children’s Language and Literacy Development, Scientific Studies of Reading, 21:6, 498-514, DOI: 10.1080/10888438.2017.1346660

Episode 2 - Interview with Dr. Melanie Schuele, PhD CCC-SLP on the Importance of Phonological Awareness (Vanderbilt University)

Glean Education's.png

What’s inside: In this episode, we interview Melanie Schuele (Vanderbilt University) about her work on phonological awareness instruction.

Classroom implications: For about 20% of students, direct, explicit phonological instruction working in concert with phonics is a critical aspect of reading instruction. Teachers need the knowledge base of how English sounds pair to their written counterparts to effectively support this instruction.

Learn more about our guest: You can learn more about the work Dr. Schuele is doing at the Child Language and Literacy Lab at Vanderbilt University Medical Center by going to ww2.mc.vanderbilt.edu/cll. Below are some links to her past research and published works referenced in this episode:

Episode 1 - Interview with Dr. Tiffany Hogan, PhD CCC-SLP (MGH) and Lauren Baron, PhD (University of South Carolina)

Glean Education's.png

What’s inside: In this episode, we interview two researchers in the area of Speech-Language Pathology, Tiffany Hogan (MGH) and Lauren Baron (University of South Carolina) about their study on the orthographic facilitation effect in students with dyslexia.

Classroom implications: The study found that orthographic facilitation supports spoken word learning in students with dyslexia. This means that if the written word accompanies the spoken word a student is trying to learn, it will help them learn the word easier (despite their known struggles with reading difficulty). If you are helping students with dyslexia learn new words, presenting the written word will help them learn it.

Learn more about our guests: To learn more about upcoming research from Lauren Baron out of University of South Carolina, you can follow her on researchgate.net/profile/lauren_baron. To learn more about Tiffany Hogan’s check out her work at seehearspeakpodcast.com.

Below are some links to research and published works referenced in this episode (full text included where possible):